Immortal Sÿnn – Force Of Habit

Immortal Sÿnn are one of those bands that you aren’t sure if they’re being serious or not with their music, but one things is for sure: it sounds like a lot of fun! While not quite party pirate metal where the ridiculous is enjoyed like groups such as Alestorm or even System Of A Down, this Colorado based group know how to blend the line between really good old fashion heavy metal tunes, punk laden anarchy lyrics, and tongue in cheek humor. Their second full length “Force Of Habit” is meant to be half taken serious, half chuckled at, all while having a head banging good time. The music style is certainly a mix of classic heavy metal like Judas Priest and a little fantasy metal such as Manowar, but it seems like the group has stepped up their game focusing on the more political side of things when being serious and then countering it with hilarity compared to their debut album back in 2017, which was a little more fantasy metal driven and the type of heavy metal driven tunes that would have been heard on early 2000 cartoons such as Justice League, Beast Wars, or South Park. As said before, a lot of fun when hearing the guitars on this album, especially the solos!

The opening ‘Anamnesis’ is just straight up melodic fantasy metal sounding- a great balance of heavy metal and rock. Nothing that Immortal Sÿnn, or about 30 other heavy metal bands, haven’t done before. Then we get more political mixed with tongue in cheek humor with tracks such as ‘Fight The Prince’ and the rather amusing acronym ‘F.U.D.C.’ Certainly meant to be a big middle finger to the big establishment but also meant to be a humorous nod considering the last few years of politics in the U.S.A., the punk driven chorus serves as great addition to the heavy metal riffs and still retains a very upbeat and enjoyable sound, which is somewhat ironic considering the lyrical content. Even the samples included are random and add humor. Then one delves into random hilarity that would make System Of A Down proud with the short, yet biting ‘The Mailman Song’ which is again another gash towards government driven services but meant to be taken in humor vs. an actual message to do some harm.

‘Nuclear Terror’ delves back into a little more seriousness with some excellent groove laden riffs and also seems to be the last one to feature their main vocalist (the group uses several). The second half of the album seems to use a different one on tracks such as ‘Satan’s Tavern’ and ‘Force Of Habit.’ The vocal pitch is much higher sounding almost more AC/DC like, and the band focuses more on their heavy metal style but touching on tongue in cheek lyrics at the same time such as on ‘Satan’s Tavern’ which has almost folk laden drinking metal riffs to go with it vs. the gritty, yet still fun ‘Denver Nights’ which is a nod to the group’s home state. The title track mixes things up a bit with some melodic interludes, something that Immortal Sÿnn haven’t really shown yet as they tend to go fast and balls to the wall with all their other tracks, so this momentary respite is a nice touch. Then we’ve got the closing ‘Whiskey II…’ which brings back that ‘Satan’s Tavern’ fun like a celebration after a good fantasy quest. The chorus is infectious like the scurvy they sing about and overall the folk elements certainly touch on the fun of pirate metal. The mix of different vocalists also help make this track a standout. Ultimately, listeners will either love or hate this album depending how serious they are about their music, but for someone who isn’t much of a heavy metal fan will probably be turned on to liking it after getting a few chuckles out of “Force Of Habit.”

3.5 / 5 STARS

Self released
Reviewer: Colin McNamara

Apr 1, 2021

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Immortal Sÿnn – Force Of Habit

review Immortal Sÿnn - Force Of Habit

1. Anamnesis
2. Fight The Prince
3. F.U.D.C.
4. The Ballad Of Marvin Heemeyer
5. The Mailman Song
6. Nuclear Terror
7. Satan’s Tavern
8. Denver Nights
9. Force Of Habit
10. Whiskey II: The Wrath Of Corn

3.5

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